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SHOAH: THE FOUR SISTERS (Masters of Cinema) DVD...
13,49 € *
zzgl. 1,49 € Versand

Eureka Entertainment to release SHOAH: THE FOUR SISTERS, a powerful and poignant 4-part documentary from Claude Lanzmann, as part of The Masters of Cinema Series in DVD & Blu-ray editions from 18 February 2019. Paula Biren, Ruth Elias, Ada Lichtman, Hanna Marton: Four Jewish women, witnesses and survivors of the most insane and pitiless barbarism, and who, for that reason alone, but for many others also, deserve to be inscribed forever into the memory of humankind. What they have in common, beside the specific horrors to which each of them were subjected, is a searingly sharp, almost-physical intelligence, which rejects all pretence or faulty reasoning. In a word, idealism. Filmed by Claude Lanzmann during the preparation of what would become Shoah, each of these four extraordinary women deserved a film in their own right, to fully illustrate their exceptional fibre, and to reveal through their gripping accounts four little-known chapters of the extermination. THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH Ruth Elias was seventeen when the Nazis invaded her native city of Moravska Ostrava, Czechoslovakia where her prosperous family had lived for generations. In April 1942, all were deported to the Theresienstadt ghetto. Elias’s parents and sister were deported to Auschwitz and soon murdered, but she was able to remain behind by marrying her boyfriend. By the winter of 1943 she became pregnant, a grave danger since pregnant women were targeted for deportation and Nazi regulations made it impossible to secure an abortion. She was sent to Auschwitz in the Fall of 1943. Interned in the infamous Czech Family Camp in Section B II B at Birkenau, she lived only a few hundred meters from a gas chamber and crematorium complex. When her pregnancy was finally recognized, she was placed under the care of the infamous Josef Mengele, who subjected her to a most cruel medical ordeal, forcing Elias to make the hardest possible decision a mother could face. THE MERRY FLEA On the very day Germany invaded Poland in September, 1939, all the men in Ada Lichtman’s town of Wieliczka were rounded up by the SS, taken to a forest and shot. One of them was Lichtman’s father, a cobbler. From then on, she was possessed by a single question: “how will I be killed?” Every day, the Germans selected more victims for execution; the survivors of these massacres, including Ada and her first husband, were driven from village to village to perform forced labour. Eventually those still alive were deported in cattle cars to the extermination camp at Sobibor where more than 250,000 Jews from across Europe would be gassed. Among only three women selected for work in the camp, Lichtman washed laundry and repaired dolls taken from Jewish children for export to Germany. The dolls forever evoked memories of this travesty. NOAH’S ARK Hanna Marton was the wife of a professor who worked with Rezsö (Rudolf) Kasztner, the head of Aid and Rescue Committee for Jewish refugees in Hungary. Once the Nazis occupied Hungary in the Spring of 1944 and began to deport thousands of Jews every day to Auschwitz-Birkenau, Kasztner negotiated with Adolf Eichmann for the release of 1,684 Jews in exchange for $1,000 per person. After an odyssey by train through the collapsing Reich, most reached safety in Switzerland. Although Kasztner had saved the largest number of Jews during the Holocaust, his plan scandalized many, because Kasztner had selected many of his family and friends, including Hanna and her husband, as well as those he deemed essential for the future of Zionism, to board the rescue train. Nearly 450,000 Hungarian Jews subsequently died in the gas chambers of Birkenau while the Martons survived. Hanna Marton remained acutely aware that her survival was purchased at the expense of countless others who died. Offered an opportunity to escape, she had taken it, though her sense of guilt about having been among the privileged in Kastner’s convoy is deeply felt during her relentlessly painful account. BAŁUTY Bałuty is the name of a slum district in the Polish city of Lodz that the Nazis designated in 1940 as the ghetto for the large Jewish population of the city. The Nazi-appointed president of the Jewish council of elders, Chaim Mordechai Rumkowski, decided that part of the community would serve the Germans as a slave labour force. His strategy may have postponed the destruction of the ghetto, but nearly 45,000 Jews died of starvation and disease in Lodz. Paula Biren was just seventeen when she was forced to move with her family into the ghetto in 1940. Upon her graduation and in need of a job to avoid being deported, Biren accepted an administrative position with Rumkowski’s Jewish women’s police force. It was only after she realized her complicity in sending black marketeers to their deaths that she quit. Biren remained in the ghetto until August of 1944 when the Germans deported everyone, including Rumkowski, to camps. Her mother and sister were gassed upon arrival in Auschwitz, and her father died shortly Features: All four interviews presented across two discs Optional English subtitles PLUS: A booklet featuring new writing

Anbieter: Zavvi
Stand: 27.05.2020
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SHOAH: THE FOUR SISTERS (Masters of Cinema) Blu...
15,49 € *
zzgl. 1,49 € Versand

Eureka Entertainment to release SHOAH: THE FOUR SISTERS, a powerful and poignant 4-part documentary from Claude Lanzmann, as part of The Masters of Cinema Series in DVD & Blu-ray editions from 18 February 2019. Paula Biren, Ruth Elias, Ada Lichtman, Hanna Marton: Four Jewish women, witnesses and survivors of the most insane and pitiless barbarism, and who, for that reason alone, but for many others also, deserve to be inscribed forever into the memory of humankind. What they have in common, beside the specific horrors to which each of them were subjected, is a searingly sharp, almost-physical intelligence, which rejects all pretence or faulty reasoning. In a word, idealism. Filmed by Claude Lanzmann during the preparation of what would become Shoah, each of these four extraordinary women deserved a film in their own right, to fully illustrate their exceptional fibre, and to reveal through their gripping accounts four little-known chapters of the extermination. THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH Ruth Elias was seventeen when the Nazis invaded her native city of Moravska Ostrava, Czechoslovakia where her prosperous family had lived for generations. In April 1942, all were deported to the Theresienstadt ghetto. Elias’s parents and sister were deported to Auschwitz and soon murdered, but she was able to remain behind by marrying her boyfriend. By the winter of 1943 she became pregnant, a grave danger since pregnant women were targeted for deportation and Nazi regulations made it impossible to secure an abortion. She was sent to Auschwitz in the Fall of 1943. Interned in the infamous Czech Family Camp in Section B II B at Birkenau, she lived only a few hundred meters from a gas chamber and crematorium complex. When her pregnancy was finally recognized, she was placed under the care of the infamous Josef Mengele, who subjected her to a most cruel medical ordeal, forcing Elias to make the hardest possible decision a mother could face. THE MERRY FLEA On the very day Germany invaded Poland in September, 1939, all the men in Ada Lichtman’s town of Wieliczka were rounded up by the SS, taken to a forest and shot. One of them was Lichtman’s father, a cobbler. From then on, she was possessed by a single question: “how will I be killed?” Every day, the Germans selected more victims for execution; the survivors of these massacres, including Ada and her first husband, were driven from village to village to perform forced labour. Eventually those still alive were deported in cattle cars to the extermination camp at Sobibor where more than 250,000 Jews from across Europe would be gassed. Among only three women selected for work in the camp, Lichtman washed laundry and repaired dolls taken from Jewish children for export to Germany. The dolls forever evoked memories of this travesty. NOAH’S ARK Hanna Marton was the wife of a professor who worked with Rezsö (Rudolf) Kasztner, the head of Aid and Rescue Committee for Jewish refugees in Hungary. Once the Nazis occupied Hungary in the Spring of 1944 and began to deport thousands of Jews every day to Auschwitz-Birkenau, Kasztner negotiated with Adolf Eichmann for the release of 1,684 Jews in exchange for $1,000 per person. After an odyssey by train through the collapsing Reich, most reached safety in Switzerland. Although Kasztner had saved the largest number of Jews during the Holocaust, his plan scandalized many, because Kasztner had selected many of his family and friends, including Hanna and her husband, as well as those he deemed essential for the future of Zionism, to board the rescue train. Nearly 450,000 Hungarian Jews subsequently died in the gas chambers of Birkenau while the Martons survived. Hanna Marton remained acutely aware that her survival was purchased at the expense of countless others who died. Offered an opportunity to escape, she had taken it, though her sense of guilt about having been among the privileged in Kastner’s convoy is deeply felt during her relentlessly painful account. BAŁUTY Bałuty is the name of a slum district in the Polish city of Lodz that the Nazis designated in 1940 as the ghetto for the large Jewish population of the city. The Nazi-appointed president of the Jewish council of elders, Chaim Mordechai Rumkowski, decided that part of the community would serve the Germans as a slave labour force. His strategy may have postponed the destruction of the ghetto, but nearly 45,000 Jews died of starvation and disease in Lodz. Paula Biren was just seventeen when she was forced to move with her family into the ghetto in 1940. Upon her graduation and in need of a job to avoid being deported, Biren accepted an administrative position with Rumkowski’s Jewish women’s police force. It was only after she realized her complicity in sending black marketeers to their deaths that she quit. Biren remained in the ghetto until August of 1944 when the Germans deported everyone, including Rumkowski, to camps. Her mother and sister were gassed upon arrival in Auschwitz, and her father died shortly Features: All four interviews presented across two discs Optional English subtitles PLUS: A booklet featuring new writing

Anbieter: Zavvi
Stand: 27.05.2020
Zum Angebot
A Report on the Banality of Integrity (eBook, e...
4,27 € *
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During World War II in Bulgaria allied with Nazi Germany there were two occasions when the nearly 50,000 Bulgarian-citizen Jews averted deportation at the last minute in a near-miraculous way. The most important role in saving the Jews was played by the Bulgarian Orthodox Church.On December 24, 1940 the Bulgarian parliament adopted The Act on Protecting the Nation which introduced discrimination against the Jewish residents and deprived them of major rights, based on the Nuremberg race laws. In debates on the law, the first to oppose Bulgaria's official Jewish policy was the synod of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church, which issued a resolution of condemnation.Target date for the first Bulgarian transports was set at March 10-11, 1943. In parallel, the deportation of the Jews in Macedonia and Thrace was begun. When this became apparent in Bulgaria, the Jewish community of Bulgaria and the portion of Bulgarian public opinion that opposed the deportation sounded the alarm.On March 9, Tsar Boris III postponed the deportations. But the threat had not disappeared. Not everyone received the postponement order. In Plovdiv several hundred Jews were collected for deportation on the morning of March 10. Plovdiv Metropolitan (Bishop) Kirill immediately telegraphed the Tsar asking for mercy. Then he went to the collection site, joined the Jews who were there and announced that he was going with them. Officials of the Orthodox Church in Sliven, Shumen, Pazardzhik, Haskovo and Samokov protested in much the same way. Finally, the postponement command reached everyone by noon.Bulgarian society has proved its viability in surviving 500 years of Ottoman domination and still being able to establish a state. But, despite the ups and downs of its history, one cannot say that it has deep-rooted middle class traditions or has built a lengthy democratic order of values, when compared to either Western or Central Europe. Nevertheless, this society was able to pull together and produce a unique outcome during the Holocaust era.Doncsev's study is focused on the issues behind that unique outcome and he attempts to explore them and get answers. In addition, he is very conscious of his Bulgarian ethnicity but has lived in Hungary his entire life. Therefore, he is very well acquainted with Bulgaria and its people but has the ability to step back and see them objectively, from the outside. Additionally, he is thoroughly acquainted with the tragedy of the Hungarian Holocaust, so he knows where to focus his attention. This is why I believe this study is both credible and fills a historical gap.András KleinHungary's Ambassador to Sofia

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 27.05.2020
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A Report on the Banality of Integrity (eBook, e...
4,27 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

During World War II in Bulgaria allied with Nazi Germany there were two occasions when the nearly 50,000 Bulgarian-citizen Jews averted deportation at the last minute in a near-miraculous way. The most important role in saving the Jews was played by the Bulgarian Orthodox Church.On December 24, 1940 the Bulgarian parliament adopted The Act on Protecting the Nation which introduced discrimination against the Jewish residents and deprived them of major rights, based on the Nuremberg race laws. In debates on the law, the first to oppose Bulgaria's official Jewish policy was the synod of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church, which issued a resolution of condemnation.Target date for the first Bulgarian transports was set at March 10-11, 1943. In parallel, the deportation of the Jews in Macedonia and Thrace was begun. When this became apparent in Bulgaria, the Jewish community of Bulgaria and the portion of Bulgarian public opinion that opposed the deportation sounded the alarm.On March 9, Tsar Boris III postponed the deportations. But the threat had not disappeared. Not everyone received the postponement order. In Plovdiv several hundred Jews were collected for deportation on the morning of March 10. Plovdiv Metropolitan (Bishop) Kirill immediately telegraphed the Tsar asking for mercy. Then he went to the collection site, joined the Jews who were there and announced that he was going with them. Officials of the Orthodox Church in Sliven, Shumen, Pazardzhik, Haskovo and Samokov protested in much the same way. Finally, the postponement command reached everyone by noon.Bulgarian society has proved its viability in surviving 500 years of Ottoman domination and still being able to establish a state. But, despite the ups and downs of its history, one cannot say that it has deep-rooted middle class traditions or has built a lengthy democratic order of values, when compared to either Western or Central Europe. Nevertheless, this society was able to pull together and produce a unique outcome during the Holocaust era.Doncsev's study is focused on the issues behind that unique outcome and he attempts to explore them and get answers. In addition, he is very conscious of his Bulgarian ethnicity but has lived in Hungary his entire life. Therefore, he is very well acquainted with Bulgaria and its people but has the ability to step back and see them objectively, from the outside. Additionally, he is thoroughly acquainted with the tragedy of the Hungarian Holocaust, so he knows where to focus his attention. This is why I believe this study is both credible and fills a historical gap.András KleinHungary's Ambassador to Sofia

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 27.05.2020
Zum Angebot
At America's Gates: Chinese Immigration During ...
9,95 € *
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With the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, Chinese laborers became the first group in American history to be excluded from the United States on the basis of their race and class. This landmark law changed the course of US immigration history, but we know little about its consequences for the Chinese in America or for the United States as a nation of immigrants. At America's Gates is the first book devoted entirely to both Chinese immigrants and the American immigration officials who sought to keep them out. Erika Lee explores how Chinese exclusion laws not only transformed Chinese American lives, immigration patterns, identities, and families but also recast the United States into a "gatekeeping nation". Immigrant identification, border enforcement, surveillance, and deportation policies were extended far beyond any controls that had existed in the United States before. Drawing on a rich trove of historical sources - including recently released immigration records, oral histories, interviews, and letters-Lee brings alive the forgotten journeys, secrets, hardships, and triumphs of Chinese immigrants. Her timely book exposes the legacy of Chinese exclusion in current American immigration control and race relations. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Emily Woo Zeller. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/tant/011650/bk_tant_011650_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 27.05.2020
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Adolfo Kaminsky: A Forger's Life , Hörbuch, Dig...
9,95 € *
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At the age of 17, Adolfo Kaminsky had narrowly escaped deportation to Auschwitz and was living in Nazi-occupied Paris, using forged documents to hide in plain sight. Due to his expert knowledge of dyes and his ability to masterfully reproduce official documents with an artistic eye, he was recruited to join the Jewish underground. He soon became the primary forger for the Resistance in Paris, working tirelessly with his network to create papers that would save an estimated 14,000 men, women, and children from certain death. Upon the Liberation, and for the next 25 years, Kaminsky worked as a professional photographer. But, recognizing the fight for freedom had not ended with the defeat of the Nazis, and driven by his own harrowing experiences, he continued to secretly forge documents for thousands of refugees, exiles, immigrants, freedom fighters, and pacifists. Kaminsky kept his past cloaked in secrecy well into his later life, until his daughter and biographer Sarah Kaminsky convinced him to share the details of the life-threatening work he did on behalf of people fighting for justice and peace throughout the world. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Simon Vance. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/tant/007129/bk_tant_007129_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 27.05.2020
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The Journey: A Tale of the Holocaust , Hörbuch,...
9,95 € *
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A dystopian tale of the Holocaust. This not a tale of war or of suffering; it is, however, a tale of survival, a child’s bravery, and a mother’s revenge. In January 1942, concentration camps were constructed by slave labor in Poland. For the deportation of Jewish men women and children to these camps, railway transport was provided by the German national railway system under the supervision of the Gestapo, the SS, and the German police. One of these children, Rachel Silbermann, a 10-year-old Jewish girl, was deported along with her family from Berlin to Auschwitz-Berkinau. By a miracle, she and her family survived the four-day journey in a cattle truck. These trucks were without heat, and, in most cases, only a bucket was provided for sanitation purposes.When Rachel arrived at Auschwitz death-camp, she came, like many other children especially twins, under the auspices of Doctor Mengele, known as "Doctor Death". But a strange twist of fate found her caring for a group of young twins. Her mother, however, unlike the rest of her family who perished, escaped and joined the Polish resistance where she learned a new trade and learned it well; she became a sniper, a very successful one. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Veleka Gray. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/131009/bk_acx0_131009_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 27.05.2020
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Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One U...
9,95 € *
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Four undocumented Mexican-American students, two great teachers, one robot-building contest... and a major motion picture. In 2004, four Latino teenagers arrived at the Marine Advanced Technology Education Robotics Competition at the University of California, Santa Barbara. They were born in Mexico but raised in Phoenix, Arizona, where they attended an underfunded public high school. No one had ever suggested to Oscar, Cristian, Luis, or Lorenzo that they might amount to much - but two inspiring science teachers had convinced these impoverished, undocumented kids from the desert who had never even seen the ocean that they should try to build an underwater robot. And build a robot they did. Their robot wasn't pretty, especially compared to those of the competition. They were going up against some of the best collegiate engineers in the country, including a team from MIT backed by a $10,000 grant from ExxonMobil. The Phoenix teenagers had scraped together less than $1,000 and built their robot out of scavenged parts. This was never a level competition - and yet, against all odds... they won! But this is just the beginning for these four, whose story - which became a key inspiration to the DREAMers movement - will go on to include first-generation college graduations, deportation, bean-picking in Mexico, and service in Afghanistan. Joshua Davis' Spare Parts is a story about overcoming insurmountable odds and four young men who proved they were among the most patriotic and talented Americans in this country - even as the country tried to kick them out. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Will Damron. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/aren/001891/bk_aren_001891_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 27.05.2020
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Talking with Angels (eBook, ePUB)
8,99 € *
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The true story of four young Hungarians seeking inner direction at a time of outer upheaval, the holocaust. The intense experience depicted in this book provides them with new direction and hope. In the darkest hours of World War II, these friends, three of them Jewish, seek orientation and meaning in their shattered lives. During seventeen months, one of them, Hanna Dallos, delivers oral messages which Gitta Mallasz and Lili Strausz record in their notebooks. These messages, or teachings as they came to be known, end abruptly with the deportation of Hanna and Lili to Ravensbrück in December of 1944. Gitta Mallasz, the only survivor of the quartet, first published the notes in France in 1976. The dialogues document an extraordinary light-filled spiritual resistance in the midst of Nazi darkness and barbarous cruelty. Hanna Dallos and Gitta Mallasz, both born in 1907, became friends at the School of Applied Arts in Budapest. Together with Hanna's husband, Joszef Kreutzer, they later established what became a successful graphic arts atelier. The three were soon joined by movement therapist Lili Strausz. The dialogues presented in this document took place between June of 1943 and November of 1944 in Budaliget and Budapest.Hanna and Lili died in Germany during a prisoner transport and Joszef in a Hungarian concentration camp in 1945. Gitta emigrated to Paris in 1960, where she edited and published the record of their experience. This document has subsequently been translated and published in numerous languages throughout the world. Gitta Mallasz died in 1992 in France. Twenty years later, she was honored as a 'Righteous Among the Nations' by Yad Vashem for having saved more than a hundred Jewish women and children. I am very happy to have encountered this book. I am deeply touched by the dialogues with the angels. - Yehudi Menuhin I could read it over and over again and never get tired of it. Thank you, thank you, thank you for sharing this book with me. - Elisabeth Kübler-Ross I feel as though the message of the angels were especially intended for me. It places me in touch with Truth and enables me to hear the call more clearly. The angels teach me how to view the world through the inner smile. - Narciso Yepes

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 27.05.2020
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