Angebote zu "Rudolf" (15 Treffer)

Kategorien

Shops

SHOAH: THE FOUR SISTERS (Masters of Cinema) DVD...
12,99 € *
zzgl. 1,49 € Versand

Eureka Entertainment to release SHOAH: THE FOUR SISTERS, a powerful and poignant 4-part documentary from Claude Lanzmann, as part of The Masters of Cinema Series in DVD & Blu-ray editions from 18 February 2019. Paula Biren, Ruth Elias, Ada Lichtman, Hanna Marton: Four Jewish women, witnesses and survivors of the most insane and pitiless barbarism, and who, for that reason alone, but for many others also, deserve to be inscribed forever into the memory of humankind. What they have in common, beside the specific horrors to which each of them were subjected, is a searingly sharp, almost-physical intelligence, which rejects all pretence or faulty reasoning. In a word, idealism. Filmed by Claude Lanzmann during the preparation of what would become Shoah, each of these four extraordinary women deserved a film in their own right, to fully illustrate their exceptional fibre, and to reveal through their gripping accounts four little-known chapters of the extermination. THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH Ruth Elias was seventeen when the Nazis invaded her native city of Moravska Ostrava, Czechoslovakia where her prosperous family had lived for generations. In April 1942, all were deported to the Theresienstadt ghetto. Elias’s parents and sister were deported to Auschwitz and soon murdered, but she was able to remain behind by marrying her boyfriend. By the winter of 1943 she became pregnant, a grave danger since pregnant women were targeted for deportation and Nazi regulations made it impossible to secure an abortion. She was sent to Auschwitz in the Fall of 1943. Interned in the infamous Czech Family Camp in Section B II B at Birkenau, she lived only a few hundred meters from a gas chamber and crematorium complex. When her pregnancy was finally recognized, she was placed under the care of the infamous Josef Mengele, who subjected her to a most cruel medical ordeal, forcing Elias to make the hardest possible decision a mother could face. THE MERRY FLEA On the very day Germany invaded Poland in September, 1939, all the men in Ada Lichtman’s town of Wieliczka were rounded up by the SS, taken to a forest and shot. One of them was Lichtman’s father, a cobbler. From then on, she was possessed by a single question: “how will I be killed?” Every day, the Germans selected more victims for execution; the survivors of these massacres, including Ada and her first husband, were driven from village to village to perform forced labour. Eventually those still alive were deported in cattle cars to the extermination camp at Sobibor where more than 250,000 Jews from across Europe would be gassed. Among only three women selected for work in the camp, Lichtman washed laundry and repaired dolls taken from Jewish children for export to Germany. The dolls forever evoked memories of this travesty. NOAH’S ARK Hanna Marton was the wife of a professor who worked with Rezsö (Rudolf) Kasztner, the head of Aid and Rescue Committee for Jewish refugees in Hungary. Once the Nazis occupied Hungary in the Spring of 1944 and began to deport thousands of Jews every day to Auschwitz-Birkenau, Kasztner negotiated with Adolf Eichmann for the release of 1,684 Jews in exchange for $1,000 per person. After an odyssey by train through the collapsing Reich, most reached safety in Switzerland. Although Kasztner had saved the largest number of Jews during the Holocaust, his plan scandalized many, because Kasztner had selected many of his family and friends, including Hanna and her husband, as well as those he deemed essential for the future of Zionism, to board the rescue train. Nearly 450,000 Hungarian Jews subsequently died in the gas chambers of Birkenau while the Martons survived. Hanna Marton remained acutely aware that her survival was purchased at the expense of countless others who died. Offered an opportunity to escape, she had taken it, though her sense of guilt about having been among the privileged in Kastner’s convoy is deeply felt during her relentlessly painful account. BAŁUTY Bałuty is the name of a slum district in the Polish city of Lodz that the Nazis designated in 1940 as the ghetto for the large Jewish population of the city. The Nazi-appointed president of the Jewish council of elders, Chaim Mordechai Rumkowski, decided that part of the community would serve the Germans as a slave labour force. His strategy may have postponed the destruction of the ghetto, but nearly 45,000 Jews died of starvation and disease in Lodz. Paula Biren was just seventeen when she was forced to move with her family into the ghetto in 1940. Upon her graduation and in need of a job to avoid being deported, Biren accepted an administrative position with Rumkowski’s Jewish women’s police force. It was only after she realized her complicity in sending black marketeers to their deaths that she quit. Biren remained in the ghetto until August of 1944 when the Germans deported everyone, including Rumkowski, to camps. Her mother and sister were gassed upon arrival in Auschwitz, and her father died shortly Features: All four interviews presented across two discs Optional English subtitles PLUS: A booklet featuring new writing

Anbieter: Zavvi
Stand: 14.08.2020
Zum Angebot
SHOAH: THE FOUR SISTERS (Masters of Cinema) Blu...
12,99 € *
zzgl. 1,49 € Versand

Eureka Entertainment to release SHOAH: THE FOUR SISTERS, a powerful and poignant 4-part documentary from Claude Lanzmann, as part of The Masters of Cinema Series in DVD & Blu-ray editions from 18 February 2019. Paula Biren, Ruth Elias, Ada Lichtman, Hanna Marton: Four Jewish women, witnesses and survivors of the most insane and pitiless barbarism, and who, for that reason alone, but for many others also, deserve to be inscribed forever into the memory of humankind. What they have in common, beside the specific horrors to which each of them were subjected, is a searingly sharp, almost-physical intelligence, which rejects all pretence or faulty reasoning. In a word, idealism. Filmed by Claude Lanzmann during the preparation of what would become Shoah, each of these four extraordinary women deserved a film in their own right, to fully illustrate their exceptional fibre, and to reveal through their gripping accounts four little-known chapters of the extermination. THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH Ruth Elias was seventeen when the Nazis invaded her native city of Moravska Ostrava, Czechoslovakia where her prosperous family had lived for generations. In April 1942, all were deported to the Theresienstadt ghetto. Elias’s parents and sister were deported to Auschwitz and soon murdered, but she was able to remain behind by marrying her boyfriend. By the winter of 1943 she became pregnant, a grave danger since pregnant women were targeted for deportation and Nazi regulations made it impossible to secure an abortion. She was sent to Auschwitz in the Fall of 1943. Interned in the infamous Czech Family Camp in Section B II B at Birkenau, she lived only a few hundred meters from a gas chamber and crematorium complex. When her pregnancy was finally recognized, she was placed under the care of the infamous Josef Mengele, who subjected her to a most cruel medical ordeal, forcing Elias to make the hardest possible decision a mother could face. THE MERRY FLEA On the very day Germany invaded Poland in September, 1939, all the men in Ada Lichtman’s town of Wieliczka were rounded up by the SS, taken to a forest and shot. One of them was Lichtman’s father, a cobbler. From then on, she was possessed by a single question: “how will I be killed?” Every day, the Germans selected more victims for execution; the survivors of these massacres, including Ada and her first husband, were driven from village to village to perform forced labour. Eventually those still alive were deported in cattle cars to the extermination camp at Sobibor where more than 250,000 Jews from across Europe would be gassed. Among only three women selected for work in the camp, Lichtman washed laundry and repaired dolls taken from Jewish children for export to Germany. The dolls forever evoked memories of this travesty. NOAH’S ARK Hanna Marton was the wife of a professor who worked with Rezsö (Rudolf) Kasztner, the head of Aid and Rescue Committee for Jewish refugees in Hungary. Once the Nazis occupied Hungary in the Spring of 1944 and began to deport thousands of Jews every day to Auschwitz-Birkenau, Kasztner negotiated with Adolf Eichmann for the release of 1,684 Jews in exchange for $1,000 per person. After an odyssey by train through the collapsing Reich, most reached safety in Switzerland. Although Kasztner had saved the largest number of Jews during the Holocaust, his plan scandalized many, because Kasztner had selected many of his family and friends, including Hanna and her husband, as well as those he deemed essential for the future of Zionism, to board the rescue train. Nearly 450,000 Hungarian Jews subsequently died in the gas chambers of Birkenau while the Martons survived. Hanna Marton remained acutely aware that her survival was purchased at the expense of countless others who died. Offered an opportunity to escape, she had taken it, though her sense of guilt about having been among the privileged in Kastner’s convoy is deeply felt during her relentlessly painful account. BAŁUTY Bałuty is the name of a slum district in the Polish city of Lodz that the Nazis designated in 1940 as the ghetto for the large Jewish population of the city. The Nazi-appointed president of the Jewish council of elders, Chaim Mordechai Rumkowski, decided that part of the community would serve the Germans as a slave labour force. His strategy may have postponed the destruction of the ghetto, but nearly 45,000 Jews died of starvation and disease in Lodz. Paula Biren was just seventeen when she was forced to move with her family into the ghetto in 1940. Upon her graduation and in need of a job to avoid being deported, Biren accepted an administrative position with Rumkowski’s Jewish women’s police force. It was only after she realized her complicity in sending black marketeers to their deaths that she quit. Biren remained in the ghetto until August of 1944 when the Germans deported everyone, including Rumkowski, to camps. Her mother and sister were gassed upon arrival in Auschwitz, and her father died shortly Features: All four interviews presented across two discs Optional English subtitles PLUS: A booklet featuring new writing

Anbieter: Zavvi
Stand: 14.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Rudy Hatfield
54,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! Rudolf Conse Hatfield II (born September 13, 1977 in Detroit, Michigan, U.S.), better known as Rudy Hatfield, is a former American-Filipino professional basketball player who last played with the Barangay Ginebra Kings. He played power forward. He completes the powerhouse cast of Barangay Ginebra Kings. Tanduay left the PBA again after the 2001 season. A firesale ensued as the Rhum Masters traded their key players Eric Menk (to Ginebra), Dondon Hontiveros (to San Miguel) Rudy was sent along with Jeffrey Cariaso (to Coca-Cola) while selling its rights to FedEx. Tanduay Rhum Masters. Hatfield had an outstanding 2003 season, capped by a spot on the Mythical Team and All-Defensive Team. In 2004 Hatfield and five others were suspended by the league after the Department of Justice (DOJ) revoked their certificates of recognition as Filipino citizens and ordered their deportation. Then in September 2005 Rudy's Filipino citizenship has been affirmed by no less than the Office of the President, though he was back in Michigan at that time.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 14.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Rudolf Wertz
34,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! Rudolf Wertz ( in Vienna, 1966) was a physician from Vienna, who received the honorary title Righteous among the Nations as Austrian. In 1941 Werzt rescued Jews from deportation to Poland by issuing confirmations of serious deseases for them. He acted out of humanitarian reasons and only charged a flat pro-forma ordination charge of 5 German Reichsmark from his jewish patients. One of the rescued was the Jew Gertrude Fritz, who, by arriving at Wertz already was referenced on a deportation list. Wertz certified her an abscess in her uterus and ordered her six weeks of bed rest. There were some Gestapo-physicians who came to her, but they believed the sickness certificate would be correct. During this time Gertrude Fritz was not deported. Later the Gestapo discovered Wertz' relief operation and he was convicted to a punishment battalion. He was not exempted till end of war and still lived till 1966.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 14.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Aufschub
24,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Aufschub - das ist ein 40minütiger Film, den Harun Farocki 2007 aus 90 Minuten ungeschnittenem, stummem Filmmaterial zusammengestellt hat. Auf Befehl des Lagerkommandanten Gemmeker musste der deutsch-jüdische Fotograf Rudolf Breslauer im holländischen "Durchgangslager" Westerbork 1944 den Alltag der Lager-Gefangenen dokumentieren, ihre Arbeit, ihre Freizeitaktivitäten - es sollte eine Art Imagefilm entstehen, der offiziellen Besuchern des Lagers vorgeführt werden sollte, um Arbeitseffizienz, Lagerorganisation und Häftlingssituation in günstigem Licht erscheinen zu lassen. Das Material gibt Bilder der Bäder, Küche, Wäscherei, Krankenhaus, Landwirtschaft zu sehen, aber auch zwei ankommende Züge und einen in die "Arbeitslager im Osten" [so die offizielle, camouflierende Bezeichnung der Vernichtungslager] abfahrenden Zug: Die Bilder zeigen nicht das, was wir von einem Holocaust-Dokument erwarten, sondern lachende Menschen, entspannte Pause während der Feldarbeit, Gymnastik, Werkstattarbeit, Bühnenshows, geschäftiges Treiben und Winkende auf dem Bahnsteig. All die Gesichter im Film zeigen uns heute eine fürchterliche Ambivalenz zwischen Hoffnung und dem Wissen, dass sie nicht zurückkehren werden - nämlich unserem nachgereichtem Wissen, weil wir wissen, wo diese Züge im Osten endeten.Farocki hat seine behutsame Montage im Stummen belassen und nur Zwischentitel eingefügt - um die Konzentration auf die Bilder zu lenken und das Grauenvolle der Deportation selbst sichtbar werden zu lassen: Jeden Dienstag ging ein Zug in Richtung Osten, und jeder der Insassen musste angst- und qualvoll Woche für Woche hoffen, dass der eigene Name beim Verlesen der Deportationsliste nicht fiel.Die Publikation beleuchtet in vier Texten unterschiedliche Aspekte des Konzentrationslagers, des Filmmaterials sowie von Harun Farockis Film AUFSCHUB. Die französische Historikerin Sylvie Lindeperg analysiert die Produktion von Breslauers Rohmaterial und seine Drehbedingungen, Axel Doßmann betrachtet AUFSCHUB vor dem Hintergrund historischer Gegebenheiten, und Florian Krautkrämer interpretiert ihn im Diskurs der Filme über die Shoah und der 'Darstellung des Unvorstellbaren'. Der Wiederabdruck von Harun Farockis Text "Wie Opfer zeigen?" enthält seine eigenen Reflexionen zum Projekt.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 14.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Rudolf Schönwald
39,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Krieg im Dunklen, nach der Natur gezeichnet ...Der österreichische Maler, Grafiker, Karikaturist, Zeichner und Staatspreisträger Rudolf Schönwald feierte 2018 seinen 90. Geburtstag. Aus diesem Anlass erscheint im Frühjahr 2019 ein opulenter Bildband, der ihm und seinem Werk gewidmet ist.Rudolf Schönwalds frühe Jahre sind geprägt durch Krieg und Flucht: 1928 in Hamburg geboren, verbrachte er eine unruhige Kindheit in Salzburg, St. Blasien und Wien. Aufgrund der Nürnberger Rassengesetze musste er 1943 nach Budapest fliehen. Dort versteckte ihn ein ungarischer Pastor und bewahrte Schönwald so vor der drohenden Deportation. Nach Kriegsende studierte er an der Akademie der bildenden Künste in Wien und teilte mit dem gleichaltrigen Alfred Hrdlicka Atelier und gesellschaftspolitisches Engagement. Mit ihrer Bildsprache entwickelten die beiden ein künstlerisches Vokabular, um ihre Gewalterfahrungen unter dem Terror-Regime der Nazizeit und die spannungsgeladene Atmosphäre zur Zeit des Kalten Krieges zu verarbeiten.Der Band lädt ein, ein facettenreiches Oeuvre aus einer Zeit zu entdecken, die der österreichischen Grafik in der zweiten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts internationales Ansehen verschaffte.Mit Beiträgen von Wolfgang Burgmair, Britta Schinzel, Erich Hackl, Susanne Neuburger, René Schober und Heidrun Rosenberg

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 14.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Rudolf Schönwald
51,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Krieg im Dunklen, nach der Natur gezeichnet ... Der österreichische Maler, Grafiker, Karikaturist, Zeichner und Staatspreisträger Rudolf Schönwald feierte 2018 seinen 90. Geburtstag. Aus diesem Anlass erscheint im Frühjahr 2019 ein opulenter Bildband, der ihm und seinem Werk gewidmet ist. Rudolf Schönwalds frühe Jahre sind geprägt durch Krieg und Flucht: 1928 in Hamburg geboren, verbrachte er eine unruhige Kindheit in Salzburg, St. Blasien und Wien. Aufgrund der Nürnberger Rassengesetze musste er 1943 nach Budapest fliehen. Dort versteckte ihn ein ungarischer Pastor und bewahrte Schönwald so vor der drohenden Deportation. Nach Kriegsende studierte er an der Akademie der bildenden Künste in Wien und teilte mit dem gleichaltrigen Alfred Hrdlicka Atelier und gesellschaftspolitisches Engagement. Mit ihrer Bildsprache entwickelten die beiden ein künstlerisches Vokabular, um ihre Gewalterfahrungen unter dem Terror-Regime der Nazizeit und die spannungsgeladene Atmosphäre zur Zeit des Kalten Krieges zu verarbeiten. Der Band lädt ein, ein facettenreiches Oeuvre aus einer Zeit zu entdecken, die der österreichischen Grafik in der zweiten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts internationales Ansehen verschaffte. Mit Beiträgen von Wolfgang Burgmair, Britta Schinzel, Erich Hackl, Susanne Neuburger, René Schober und Heidrun Rosenberg

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 14.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Ich kann nicht vergeben
17,00 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

'Irgendwie fanden wir es nicht richtig, dass die Welt sich weitergedreht hatte, während es Auschwitz gab, dass die Leute gelacht und gescherzt, getrunken und sich geliebt hatten, während Millionen starben und wir um unser Leben kämpften.' 'Ich kann nicht vergeben - Meine Flucht aus Auschwitz' ist ein einmaliges Erinnerungsdokument. Es erzählt, wie ein erst siebzehnjähriger Slowake in Auschwitz überlebte. Wie er sich vor der Willkür der SS und ihren Kapos schützte, wie er Strafen und Krankheiten überstand, sich bei den Widerstandskämpfern im Lager Respekt verschaffte und sogar einen seltenen Augenblick der Liebe erlebte. Mehr noch: wie er es als einer der wenigen schaffte, zusammen mit seinem Freund Alfréd Wetzler dieser hermetisch abgeriegelten Hölle zu entfliehen. Doch dieser junge Mann war nicht allein auf seine Freiheit bedacht, sondern versuchte alles, um die letzte grosse Massenmordaktion der Nationalsozialisten, die Deportation der ungarischen Juden, zu verhindern. Tatsächlich rettete der im April 1944 erstattete Vrba-Wetzler-Bericht hunderttausend Menschenleben. 'Rudolf Vrba war ungeheuer widerstandsfähig, ein tapferer, verwegener, zäher und unbestechlicher Mensch. Sein schwarzer Humor zusammen mit seiner bestechenden Intelligenz ermöglichten ihm das Überleben: zunächst während zweier Jahre in Majdanek, danach in Auschwitz, bis ihm die schier unmögliche Flucht aus der Gefangenschaft gelang. Rudolf Vrba erzählt ganz wunderbar, weder pathetisch noch selbstmitleidig, dafür mit einer unglaublichen Präzision, einer schneidenden Schärfe und, wo es angemessen ist, voller Menschlichkeit. Wie er in seinem Buch ICH KANN NICHT VERGEBEN. MEINE FLUCHT AUS AUSCHWITZ unvorstellbare Greuel schildert und die dramatischen Ereignisse seiner Flucht beschreibt, ist für mich eines der prägendsten, erschütterndsten Leseerlebnisse über den Holocaust.' Claude Lanzmann

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 14.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Ich kann nicht vergeben
14,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

'Irgendwie fanden wir es nicht richtig, dass die Welt sich weitergedreht hatte, während es Auschwitz gab, dass die Leute gelacht und gescherzt, getrunken und sich geliebt hatten, während Millionen starben und wir um unser Leben kämpften.' 'Ich kann nicht vergeben - Meine Flucht aus Auschwitz' ist ein einmaliges Erinnerungsdokument. Es erzählt, wie ein erst siebzehnjähriger Slowake in Auschwitz überlebte. Wie er sich vor der Willkür der SS und ihren Kapos schützte, wie er Strafen und Krankheiten überstand, sich bei den Widerstandskämpfern im Lager Respekt verschaffte und sogar einen seltenen Augenblick der Liebe erlebte. Mehr noch: wie er es als einer der wenigen schaffte, zusammen mit seinem Freund Alfréd Wetzler dieser hermetisch abgeriegelten Hölle zu entfliehen. Doch dieser junge Mann war nicht allein auf seine Freiheit bedacht, sondern versuchte alles, um die letzte große Massenmordaktion der Nationalsozialisten, die Deportation der ungarischen Juden, zu verhindern. Tatsächlich rettete der im April 1944 erstattete Vrba-Wetzler-Bericht hunderttausend Menschenleben. 'Rudolf Vrba war ungeheuer widerstandsfähig, ein tapferer, verwegener, zäher und unbestechlicher Mensch. Sein schwarzer Humor zusammen mit seiner bestechenden Intelligenz ermöglichten ihm das Überleben: zunächst während zweier Jahre in Majdanek, danach in Auschwitz, bis ihm die schier unmögliche Flucht aus der Gefangenschaft gelang. Rudolf Vrba erzählt ganz wunderbar, weder pathetisch noch selbstmitleidig, dafür mit einer unglaublichen Präzision, einer schneidenden Schärfe und, wo es angemessen ist, voller Menschlichkeit. Wie er in seinem Buch ICH KANN NICHT VERGEBEN. MEINE FLUCHT AUS AUSCHWITZ unvorstellbare Greuel schildert und die dramatischen Ereignisse seiner Flucht beschreibt, ist für mich eines der prägendsten, erschütterndsten Leseerlebnisse über den Holocaust.' Claude Lanzmann

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 14.08.2020
Zum Angebot