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The Pianist - Zavvi Exclusive Limited Edition S...
22,99 € *
zzgl. 1,49 € Versand

Zavvi Exclusive Limited Edition Steelbook. Ultra Limited Print Run. A brilliant pianist, a Polish Jew, witnesses the restrictions Nazis place on Jews in the Polish capital, from restricted access to the building of the Warsaw ghetto. As his family is rounded up to be shipped off to the Nazi labour camps, he escapes deportation and eludes capture by living in the ruins of Warsaw.

Anbieter: Zavvi
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Reynaud, Michel: Jehovah's Witnesses and the Nazis
32,99 € *
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Erscheinungsdatum: 29.05.2001, Medium: Buch, Einband: Gebunden, Titel: Jehovah's Witnesses and the Nazis, Titelzusatz: Persecution, Deportation, and Murder, 1933-1945, Autor: Reynaud, Michel // Graffard, Sylvie, Verlag: Cooper Square Publishers, Sprache: Englisch, Schlagworte: HISTORY // Holocaust, Rubrik: Geschichte // 20. Jahrhundert, Seiten: 320, Informationen: HC gerader Rücken mit Schutzumschlag, Gewicht: 499 gr, Verkäufer: averdo

Anbieter: averdo
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Jehovah's Witnesses and the Nazis
29,49 € *
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Jehovah's Witnesses and the Nazis ab 29.49 € als gebundene Ausgabe: Persecution Deportation and Murder 1933-1945. Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Wissenschaft, Geschichte,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 11.07.2020
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SHOAH: THE FOUR SISTERS (Masters of Cinema) DVD...
12,99 € *
zzgl. 1,49 € Versand

Eureka Entertainment to release SHOAH: THE FOUR SISTERS, a powerful and poignant 4-part documentary from Claude Lanzmann, as part of The Masters of Cinema Series in DVD & Blu-ray editions from 18 February 2019. Paula Biren, Ruth Elias, Ada Lichtman, Hanna Marton: Four Jewish women, witnesses and survivors of the most insane and pitiless barbarism, and who, for that reason alone, but for many others also, deserve to be inscribed forever into the memory of humankind. What they have in common, beside the specific horrors to which each of them were subjected, is a searingly sharp, almost-physical intelligence, which rejects all pretence or faulty reasoning. In a word, idealism. Filmed by Claude Lanzmann during the preparation of what would become Shoah, each of these four extraordinary women deserved a film in their own right, to fully illustrate their exceptional fibre, and to reveal through their gripping accounts four little-known chapters of the extermination. THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH Ruth Elias was seventeen when the Nazis invaded her native city of Moravska Ostrava, Czechoslovakia where her prosperous family had lived for generations. In April 1942, all were deported to the Theresienstadt ghetto. Elias’s parents and sister were deported to Auschwitz and soon murdered, but she was able to remain behind by marrying her boyfriend. By the winter of 1943 she became pregnant, a grave danger since pregnant women were targeted for deportation and Nazi regulations made it impossible to secure an abortion. She was sent to Auschwitz in the Fall of 1943. Interned in the infamous Czech Family Camp in Section B II B at Birkenau, she lived only a few hundred meters from a gas chamber and crematorium complex. When her pregnancy was finally recognized, she was placed under the care of the infamous Josef Mengele, who subjected her to a most cruel medical ordeal, forcing Elias to make the hardest possible decision a mother could face. THE MERRY FLEA On the very day Germany invaded Poland in September, 1939, all the men in Ada Lichtman’s town of Wieliczka were rounded up by the SS, taken to a forest and shot. One of them was Lichtman’s father, a cobbler. From then on, she was possessed by a single question: “how will I be killed?” Every day, the Germans selected more victims for execution; the survivors of these massacres, including Ada and her first husband, were driven from village to village to perform forced labour. Eventually those still alive were deported in cattle cars to the extermination camp at Sobibor where more than 250,000 Jews from across Europe would be gassed. Among only three women selected for work in the camp, Lichtman washed laundry and repaired dolls taken from Jewish children for export to Germany. The dolls forever evoked memories of this travesty. NOAH’S ARK Hanna Marton was the wife of a professor who worked with Rezsö (Rudolf) Kasztner, the head of Aid and Rescue Committee for Jewish refugees in Hungary. Once the Nazis occupied Hungary in the Spring of 1944 and began to deport thousands of Jews every day to Auschwitz-Birkenau, Kasztner negotiated with Adolf Eichmann for the release of 1,684 Jews in exchange for $1,000 per person. After an odyssey by train through the collapsing Reich, most reached safety in Switzerland. Although Kasztner had saved the largest number of Jews during the Holocaust, his plan scandalized many, because Kasztner had selected many of his family and friends, including Hanna and her husband, as well as those he deemed essential for the future of Zionism, to board the rescue train. Nearly 450,000 Hungarian Jews subsequently died in the gas chambers of Birkenau while the Martons survived. Hanna Marton remained acutely aware that her survival was purchased at the expense of countless others who died. Offered an opportunity to escape, she had taken it, though her sense of guilt about having been among the privileged in Kastner’s convoy is deeply felt during her relentlessly painful account. BAŁUTY Bałuty is the name of a slum district in the Polish city of Lodz that the Nazis designated in 1940 as the ghetto for the large Jewish population of the city. The Nazi-appointed president of the Jewish council of elders, Chaim Mordechai Rumkowski, decided that part of the community would serve the Germans as a slave labour force. His strategy may have postponed the destruction of the ghetto, but nearly 45,000 Jews died of starvation and disease in Lodz. Paula Biren was just seventeen when she was forced to move with her family into the ghetto in 1940. Upon her graduation and in need of a job to avoid being deported, Biren accepted an administrative position with Rumkowski’s Jewish women’s police force. It was only after she realized her complicity in sending black marketeers to their deaths that she quit. Biren remained in the ghetto until August of 1944 when the Germans deported everyone, including Rumkowski, to camps. Her mother and sister were gassed upon arrival in Auschwitz, and her father died shortly Features: All four interviews presented across two discs Optional English subtitles PLUS: A booklet featuring new writing

Anbieter: Zavvi
Stand: 11.07.2020
Zum Angebot
SHOAH: THE FOUR SISTERS (Masters of Cinema) Blu...
12,99 € *
zzgl. 1,49 € Versand

Eureka Entertainment to release SHOAH: THE FOUR SISTERS, a powerful and poignant 4-part documentary from Claude Lanzmann, as part of The Masters of Cinema Series in DVD & Blu-ray editions from 18 February 2019. Paula Biren, Ruth Elias, Ada Lichtman, Hanna Marton: Four Jewish women, witnesses and survivors of the most insane and pitiless barbarism, and who, for that reason alone, but for many others also, deserve to be inscribed forever into the memory of humankind. What they have in common, beside the specific horrors to which each of them were subjected, is a searingly sharp, almost-physical intelligence, which rejects all pretence or faulty reasoning. In a word, idealism. Filmed by Claude Lanzmann during the preparation of what would become Shoah, each of these four extraordinary women deserved a film in their own right, to fully illustrate their exceptional fibre, and to reveal through their gripping accounts four little-known chapters of the extermination. THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH Ruth Elias was seventeen when the Nazis invaded her native city of Moravska Ostrava, Czechoslovakia where her prosperous family had lived for generations. In April 1942, all were deported to the Theresienstadt ghetto. Elias’s parents and sister were deported to Auschwitz and soon murdered, but she was able to remain behind by marrying her boyfriend. By the winter of 1943 she became pregnant, a grave danger since pregnant women were targeted for deportation and Nazi regulations made it impossible to secure an abortion. She was sent to Auschwitz in the Fall of 1943. Interned in the infamous Czech Family Camp in Section B II B at Birkenau, she lived only a few hundred meters from a gas chamber and crematorium complex. When her pregnancy was finally recognized, she was placed under the care of the infamous Josef Mengele, who subjected her to a most cruel medical ordeal, forcing Elias to make the hardest possible decision a mother could face. THE MERRY FLEA On the very day Germany invaded Poland in September, 1939, all the men in Ada Lichtman’s town of Wieliczka were rounded up by the SS, taken to a forest and shot. One of them was Lichtman’s father, a cobbler. From then on, she was possessed by a single question: “how will I be killed?” Every day, the Germans selected more victims for execution; the survivors of these massacres, including Ada and her first husband, were driven from village to village to perform forced labour. Eventually those still alive were deported in cattle cars to the extermination camp at Sobibor where more than 250,000 Jews from across Europe would be gassed. Among only three women selected for work in the camp, Lichtman washed laundry and repaired dolls taken from Jewish children for export to Germany. The dolls forever evoked memories of this travesty. NOAH’S ARK Hanna Marton was the wife of a professor who worked with Rezsö (Rudolf) Kasztner, the head of Aid and Rescue Committee for Jewish refugees in Hungary. Once the Nazis occupied Hungary in the Spring of 1944 and began to deport thousands of Jews every day to Auschwitz-Birkenau, Kasztner negotiated with Adolf Eichmann for the release of 1,684 Jews in exchange for $1,000 per person. After an odyssey by train through the collapsing Reich, most reached safety in Switzerland. Although Kasztner had saved the largest number of Jews during the Holocaust, his plan scandalized many, because Kasztner had selected many of his family and friends, including Hanna and her husband, as well as those he deemed essential for the future of Zionism, to board the rescue train. Nearly 450,000 Hungarian Jews subsequently died in the gas chambers of Birkenau while the Martons survived. Hanna Marton remained acutely aware that her survival was purchased at the expense of countless others who died. Offered an opportunity to escape, she had taken it, though her sense of guilt about having been among the privileged in Kastner’s convoy is deeply felt during her relentlessly painful account. BAŁUTY Bałuty is the name of a slum district in the Polish city of Lodz that the Nazis designated in 1940 as the ghetto for the large Jewish population of the city. The Nazi-appointed president of the Jewish council of elders, Chaim Mordechai Rumkowski, decided that part of the community would serve the Germans as a slave labour force. His strategy may have postponed the destruction of the ghetto, but nearly 45,000 Jews died of starvation and disease in Lodz. Paula Biren was just seventeen when she was forced to move with her family into the ghetto in 1940. Upon her graduation and in need of a job to avoid being deported, Biren accepted an administrative position with Rumkowski’s Jewish women’s police force. It was only after she realized her complicity in sending black marketeers to their deaths that she quit. Biren remained in the ghetto until August of 1944 when the Germans deported everyone, including Rumkowski, to camps. Her mother and sister were gassed upon arrival in Auschwitz, and her father died shortly Features: All four interviews presented across two discs Optional English subtitles PLUS: A booklet featuring new writing

Anbieter: Zavvi
Stand: 11.07.2020
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On Either Side , Hörbuch, Digital, 1, 369min
9,95 € *
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The haunted mind of a brave patriot; a bitter betrayal by the Third Reich, soothed by the arms of a forbidden affair. On Either Side is essentially a love story set during World War II between a young German SS Officer, Karl Wulf, and an English nurse Brenda King. The couple meet late in the book when Karl is wounded at the Battle for Caen and brought to a British Field Hospital on the outskirts of the city. Before this Karl is awarded the Knight's Cross for courage and loyalty to the Reich demonstrated on the Eastern Front, and is assigned by Heinrich Himmler for rest and recuperation to the Sobibor death camp in a benign role to convalesce for a few weeks before being sent back to active service. Here he discovers the true purpose of the camp and is appalled and mentally scarred by the genocide he witnesses. With the help of another guard at the camp he plans a successful escape of a small group of Jewish prisoners. However, he is suspected of collusion with the escape and so sent back to Berlin. But Himmler admires the qualities of Karl, his bravery and conscientiousness, and adopts him briefly as a confidante before being reunited with his Sobibor co-conspirator and being sent to Limoges in Vichy France to take over command of an SS field base at Masset Farm in Oradour-sur-Glane (village infamous for the Oradour massacre). With the onset of the D-Day invasion, Karl's orders are changed and he is sent to Paris, under the supervision of the German hierarchy, to root out Jews hiding in the city for deportation to the death camps. But his conscience couldn't entertain such orders and so, before he leaves for Paris, he arranges an escape route, with the help of a local priest, for Jews from Paris to a temporary safe house at Oradour en route to freedom in Spain. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Rebecca McKernan. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/106353/bk_acx0_106353_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Jehovah's Witnesses and the Nazis
29,49 € *
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Jehovah's Witnesses and the Nazis ab 29.49 EURO Persecution Deportation and Murder 1933-1945

Anbieter: ebook.de
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Hachette UK An Iron Wind Buch Gebundenes Buch E...
27,80 € *
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A vivid account of German-occupied Europe during World War II that reveals civilians' struggle to understand the terrifying chaos of war In An Iron Wind, prize-winning historian Peter Fritzsche draws diaries, letters, and other first-person accounts to show how civilians in occupied Europe tried to make sense of World War II. As the Third Reich targeted Europe's Jews for deportation and death, confusion and mistrust reigned. What were Hitler's aims? Did Germany's rapid early victories mark the start of an enduring new era? Was collaboration or resistance the wisest response to occupation? How far should solidarity and empathy extend? And where was God? People desperately tried to understand the horrors around them, but the stories they told themselves often justified a selfish indifference to their neighbors' fates. Piecing together the broken words of the war's witnesses and victims, Fritzsche offers a haunting picture of the most violent conflict in modern history.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Secularism Confronts Islam
88,90 CHF *
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The denunciation of fundamentalism in France, embodied in the law against the veil and the deportation of imams, has shifted into a systematic attack on all Muslims and Islam. This hostility is rooted in the belief that Islam cannot be integrated into French& mdash;and, consequently, secular and liberal-society. However, as Olivier Roy makes clear in this book, Muslim intellectuals have made it possible for Muslims to live concretely in a secularized world while maintaining the identity of a 'true believer.' They have formulated a language that recognizes two spaces: that of religion and that of secular society. Western society is unable to recognize this process, Roy argues, because of a cultural bias that assumes religious practice is embedded within a specific, traditional culture that must be either erased entirely or forced to coexist in a neutral, multicultural space. Instead, Roy shows that new forms of religiosity, such as Islamic fundamentalism and Christian evangelicalism, have come to thrive in post-traditional, secular contexts precisely because they remain detached from any cultural background. In recognizing this, Roy recasts the debate concerning Islam and democracy. Analyzing the French case in particular, in which the tension between Islam and the conception of Western secularism is exacerbated, Roy makes important distinctions between Arab and non-Arab Muslims, hegemony and tolerance, and the role of the umma and the sharia in Muslim religious life. He pits Muslim religious revivalism against similar movements in the West, such as evangelical Protestantism and Jehovah's Witnesses, and refutes the myth of a single 'Muslim community' by detailing different groups and their inability to overcome their differences. Roy's rare portrait of the realities of immigrant Muslim life offers a necessary alternative to the popular specter of an 'Islamic threat.' Supporting his arguments with his extensive research on Islamic history, sociology, and politics, Roy brilliantly demonstrates the limits of our understanding of contemporary Islamic religious practice in the West and the role of Islam as a screen onto which Western societies project their own identity crisis.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 11.07.2020
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